Home | Contact Us | Coupons | Events Calendar | Gas Prices | Happy Hour | Night Life | Shopping Cart | Site Map | Traffic | Weather | Wedding Zone | Login | Register


Navigation



LIKE US CONTEST



 
Health

WebMD Health Logo WebMD Health

Bookmark and Share

Illnesses Linked to Venezuela Crab Meat: FDA Illnesses began between April 1 and July 3, with eight cases in Maryland, two in Louisiana and one each in Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia.

More...
Vitamin D Little Help Against Brain Diseases There's no special protective benefit for the brain in vitamin D, a new review of research on the topic has found.

More...
Can Dogs Keep Kids from Getting Allergies? Scientists believe the results say it’s likely that dogs make bacteria in the home and the body more diverse, and therefore help strengthen the immune system.

More...
Working Yourself to Death: Long Hours Bring Risks Putting in long hours at the office could make you more likely to get diabetes, heart disease and psychiatric disorders, research suggests.

More...
Study: Nearly Half of Gay Men Face Domestic Abuse In a University of Michigan study of gay men, 46 percent reported some form of intimate partner abuse in the last year, including physical and sexual violence, emotional abuse and controlling behavior.

More...
Eczema Can Dramatically Hurt Quality of Life The allergic skin condition eczema can seriously damage overall health and quality of life, a new survey finds.

More...
FDA Recalls Some Valsartan Drugs Due to Impurity The FDA is investigating how much NDMA is in the recalled products and is trying to find out the possible effects on patients who have been taking them.

More...
Opioids Given Too Easily to Children, Study Finds More than one in 10 kids enrolled in Tennessee's Medicaid program received an opioid prescription each year between 1999 and 2014, even though they did not have a severe condition requiring powerful painkillers, researchers have found.

More...
Smoking May Boost Risk of AFib Smokers are at increased risk of atrial fibrillation, but the risk is reduced considerably in those who quit, researchers in Norway have found.

More...
Too Few Kids Screened For Developmental Delays Fewer than one-third of U.S. children under 3 years old receive recommended screening for developmental problems, researchers at John Hopkins University report.

More...
Is Depression During Pregnancy on the Rise? Compared with their mothers' generation, young women who became pregnant between 2012 and 2016 were at greater risk of having "high" scores when they were screened for depression, British researchers report.

More...
100 Now Sick from Salmonella-Tainted Cereal Salmonella linked to Kellogg's Honey Smacks cereal has now sickened 100 people across 33 states, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

More...
1 in 9 U.S. Adults Over 45 Reports Memory Issues One in nine Americans aged 45 and older say they are having thinking problems, like confusion and memory loss, which the CDC says are not a normal part of aging.

More...
Heart Disease in Dogs May be Tied to Certain... Large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers have a genetic risk for canine DCM, a disease of the heart muscle that often leads to congestive heart failure.

More...
Can You Eat Your Way to Better Asthma Control? Diets rich in fruits and vegetables and with less processed food were tied to a 30 percent lower risk of developing asthma symptoms for men, and a 20 percent lower risk for women, researchers have found.

More...
Brains May Be as Unique as Fingerprints Differences in genes and life experience change the structure of every individual's brain, so no two are just alike, a new study confirms.

More...
Are Concussions Tougher on Athletes With ADHD? Young athletes who have ADHD may be more likely to have symptoms of depression and anxiety after a concussion, new research shows.

More...
Under New Guidelines, More Kids Have Hypertension New hypertension guidelines issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2017 lowered the threshold for a diagnosis of high blood pressure in those under 19 years of age, and that means 795,000 more children are now classified as having the condition than before.

More...
Fatty Fare a Fave for 'Otzi the Iceman' The wild meat consumed by Otzi was eaten fresh or perhaps dried. The presence of toxic bracken particles could be due to Otzi taking bracken as a way to treat intestinal problems caused by parasites, or by using the leaves to wrap food.

More...
Researchers Probe Autism's Origins in the Brain Researchers are looking for clues to autism in the structure of the brain, specifically the cerebellum.

More...
Scientists Reprogram Immune Cells to Fight Cancer A team of scientists say they've developed a new, faster method to reprogram T cells, which normally target bacterial or fungal infections, into cancer fighters.

More...
Half of Americans Trying to Slim Down Half of Americans say they've tried to lose weight in the past year -- including two-thirds of those who were obese, CDC researchers say.

More...
Immune Therapy May Help Melanoma in the Brain A therapy that harnesses the body’s immune system to target and destroy cancer cells has been found to help people with melanoma that has spread to the brain.

More...
Study: High Blood Pressure Threatens Aging Brain Older people with high systolic blood pressure readings (the top number) had higher risks of having blood vessel blockages in the brain and tangles linked to Alzheimer's disease, researchers found in a study that tracked more than 1,300 people until they died.

More...
Report: Dog Illness Can Spread to Humans A strain of bacterium carried by dogs -- Brucella canis -- could be widespread in humans, according to a report from Texas A&M University.

More...
Lawsuits Alleging Roundup Causes Cancer To... While the decision means the lawsuits can move forward, the judge noted that it could be a "daunting challenge" to convince him to allow a jury to hear testimony that glyphosate was responsible for individual cancer cases, the AP reported.

More...
FDA Adds Stronger Warnings to Fluoroquinolones The FDA is adding new warnings to fluoroquinolones, a class of powerful antibiotics that have been found to cause dangerous drops in blood sugar as memory problems and delirium.

More...
Any Exercise Helps Beat Post-Smoking Pounds Being active, even a little, after quitting smoking helps reduce weight gain, researchers say.

More...
Feel Younger Than Your Years? Your Brain Shows It If you feel younger than your years, the structure of your brain is different, a small new study finds.

More...
Keto's Fans Boost Controversial Diet's Profile Nearly a century after Mayo Clinic physicians developed it as a last-ditch therapy for epileptic children, the ketogenic diet is back and hitting the mainstream, lauded as everything from a quick way to drop pounds to a promising therapy for neurological problems.

More...
Insurance Gaps Costly With Type 1 Diabetes Gaps in insurance coverage among people who have type 1 diabetes are more common than thought, putting them at greater risk for health emergencies.

More...
3 of 4 Black Americans Have Hypertension by 55 Three-quarters of black men and women in the United States have high blood pressure by age 55, a much higher rate than for white people, according to a new study.

More...
'So Much Guilt' After Daughter Breaks Leg on... A study found children under the age of 3 particularly at risk of broken bones from playground slides. They were 12 times more likely than older kids to be identified as riding on a lap at the time of their injury.

More...
Scientists Get Closer to Origins of Hot Flashes Scientists have found that a neuron present in the brains of both mice and humans causes hot flashes when it's stimulated in mice.

More...
Hundreds Sickened From Del Monte Vegetable Trays The outbreak was most likely caused by pre-packaged Del Monte Fresh Produce vegetable trays containing broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, and dill dip, officials said.

More...
PTSD May Put 9/11 First Responders' Hearts at... About 20 percent of men and 26 percent of women who responded when the twin towers were attacked on Sept. 11, 2001 developed PTSD, which is at least twice the rate expected in the general population, the researchers said.

More...
Less Appeal for Men's Testosterone Supplements The number of men receiving testosterone therapy declined by 48 percent between 2013 and 2016, following a sixfold increase in prescriptions during the prior decade, researchers found.

More...
Wearable, At-Home Patch Could Spot A-Fib Early A wearable patch could help doctors diagnose atrial fibrillation faster.

More...
U.S. Stance on Breastfeeding Resolution... A report that the United States tried to weaken a U.N. resolution on breastfeeding is raising questions about U.S. intentions.

More...
Scientists Identify Protein Linked to Armpit Odor ;aslkdflaksdj

More...
More Social Media Time Raises Cyberbullying Risk 12,000 teens in Germany, Poland and Romania who used social network sites for more than two hours a day were at increased risk for cyberbullying, a new study has found.

More...
More Evidence That Supplements Won't Help Your... The Council for Responsible Nutrition, a trade association representing supplement makers, stressed that the products are meant as nutritional aids only, not as a means of preventing or treating illness.

More...
Your Diabetes Could Improve Your Family's Health People who lives with someone newly diagnosed with diabetes were more likely to attend weight management classes and to get medication to help quit smoking, according to a new study.

More...
Your Tough Childhood Can Hurt Your Kids Later If you were abused or had other hard times as a child, your children are more likely to have ADHD or a mental health issue, new research has found.

More...
Want Good Sleep for Baby? Food May Be Key A new British study suggests that your baby may sleep better if solid foods are introduced relatively early, a finding that contradicts long-held practice in the United States and elsewhere.

More...
White House ACA Change Could Mean Higher Premiums The change, which is expected to add to premium increases next year, was slammed by major insurance groups, who said the program is working well, the Associated Press reported.

More...
Doctor Burnout Widespread, Drives Medical Errors More than 10 percent of physicians in a recent survey said they had made at least one significant medical mistake in the last three months, and researchers concluded that those suffering from burnout were twice as likely to make a medical error.

More...
Germs Grow on Medical Implants; Risk Unclear A new study finds germs growing on medical implants including knee and hip joints and pacemakers, but it's not clear if they're beneficial or could lead to infection.

More...
Experimental HIV Vaccine Promising in Early Trial An experimental HIV vaccine triggered an immune response in humans and protected monkeys in the early stages of a clinical trial, researchers report.

More...
Focus on Partnership Drives Most Egg Freezing Most women who freeze their eggs do so because they're looking for a stable relationship, not because they're focusing on career, a new study finds.

More...
Articles last updated at Jul 17, 2018 06:01:38am.
Next update in 60 minutes.
 
Translator

 


Search Our Site

Search for:




Top Categories

Adopt-A-Pet Happy Hour
Automotive Local Jobs
Beauty & Spa Night Life
Concerts & Shows Pet Services
Coupons Shopping
Dining Guide Things To Do
Events Traffic
Fairs & Festivals Weather
Gas Prices Wedding Zone


Check Out Our

 




Copyright 2018, WhatsUpLehighValley.com